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Sutcliff, RosemarySutcliff, Rosemary | Alt 1
Sutcliff, RosemarySutcliff, Rosemary | Alt 1

Rosemary Sutcliff

Rosemary Sutcliff (1920-1992) wrote over 40 novels for young adults, including Mark of the Horse Lord, Black Ships Before Troy, The Wanderings of Odysseus, and The Eagle of the Ninth; five adult novels, including Sword at Sunset; and several books of nonfiction.
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Titles by Rosemary Sutcliff

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Titles Found: 2
The Mark of the Horse Lord
The Mark of the Horse Lord (4 Formats) ›
By Rosemary Sutcliff, Afterword by Scott O'Dell
Trade Paper Price 12.95

Trade Paper, PDF, EPUB, Mobipocket

Published Jul 2015

"There was a smell of blood mingling with the smell of burning that still clung about scorched timber and blackened thatch, and a great wailing rose from the watching crowd. The old High Priest dipped a finger in the blood and made a sign with it on Phaedrus's forehead, above the Mark of the Horse Lord." So began the ceremony that was to make young Phaedrus, ex-slave and gladiator, Horse Lord of the Dalriadain. Phaedrus had come a long way since the fight in the arena that gained him his freedom. He had left behind his old Roman life and identity and had entered another, more primitive, world—that of the British tribes in the far north. In this world of superstition and ancient ritual, of fierce loyalties and intertribal rivalry, Phaedrus found companionship and love, and something more—a purpose and a meaning to his life as he came fully to understand the significance of the Mark of the Horse Lord. First published in 1965 but long out of print, The Mark of the Horse Lord has been acclaimed by many readers as the finest of Rosemary Sutcliff's many novels, imparting true insight into the nature of leadership, identity, heroism, loyalty, and sacrifice.
Sword at Sunset
Sword at Sunset (4 Formats) ›
By Rosemary Sutcliff, Foreword by Jack Whyte
Trade Paper Price 24.99

Trade Paper, PDF, EPUB, Mobipocket

Published May 2008

This brilliant Arthurian epic cuts through the mists of pagan, early Christian, and medieval splendors that have gathered about the subject and tells the authentic story of the man who may well have been the real King Arthur—Artos the Bear, the mighty warrior-king who saved the last lights of Western civilization when the barbarian darkness descended in the fifth century. Presenting early Britain as it was after the departure of the Romans—no Round Table, no many-towered Camelot—the setting is a hard, savage land, half-civilized, half-pagan, where a few men struggled to forge a nation and hold back the Saxon scourge. Richly detailed, the story chronicles the formation of a great army, the hardships of winter quarters, the primitive wedding feasts, the pagan fertility rites, the agonies of surgery after battle, the thrilling stag hunts, and the glorious processions of the era. Stripped of the chivalric embellishments that the French applied to British history centuries ago, the Arthurian age here emerges as a time when men stood at the precipice of history—a time of transition and changing values and imminent national peril.