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Conrad Richter

One of America's greatest novelists, Conrad Richter (1890–1968) wrote 15 novels, most of them set on the American frontier, including The Light in the Forest and The Sea of Grass, as well as numerous short stories. His novels won the National Book Award, the Pulitzer Prize, and many other accolades.
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Titles by Conrad Richter

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Titles Found: 3
The Fields
The Fields ›
By Conrad Richter, Foreword by David McCullough
Price 18.99

Trade Paper

Published Nov 2017

The Fields tells the story of Sayward as a wife and mother, working with her own brood on that hard frontier to create a durable home, and aspects of civilization in a region where life is still difficult and towns are just beginning to appear. It is a rich and human novel about personal conflicts and strife in the midst of a land that itself is striving. And it has an epic quality that perfectly reflects the sweeping conquest of the frontier.
The Town
The Town ›
By Conrad Richter, Foreword by David McCullough
Price 21.99

Trade Paper

Published Nov 2017

The Town, the longest novel of the trilogy, won the 1951 Pulitzer Prize. It tells how Sayward completes her mission and lives to see the transition of her family and her friends, American pioneers, from the ways of wilderness to the ways of civilization. Here is the tumultuous story of how the Lucketts grow to face the turmoil of the first half of the 19th century.
The Trees
The Trees ›
By Conrad Richter, Foreword by David McCullough
Price 18.99

Trade Paper

Published Nov 2017

The Trees is the story of an American family in the wilderness—a family that "followed the woods as some families follow the sea." The time is the end of the 18th century, the wilderness is the land west of the Alleghenies and north of the Ohio River. But principally, The Trees is the story of a girl named Sayward, eldest daughter of Worth and Jary Luckett, raised in the forest far from the rest of humankind, yet growing to realize that the way of the hunter must cede to the way of the tiller of soil.