History & Politics

History & Politics

The President Is a Sick Man
The President Is a Sick Man ›
By Matthew Algeo

Published May 2011

An extraordinary yet almost unknown chapter in American history is revealed in this extensively researched exposé. On July 1, 1893, President Grover Cleveland boarded a friend’s yacht and was not heard from for five days. During that time, a team of doctors removed a cancerous tumor from the president’s palate along with much of his upper jaw. When an enterprising reporter named E. J. Edwards exposed the secret operation, Cleveland denied it and Edwards was consequently dismissed as a disgrace to journalism. Twenty-four years later, one of the president’s doctors finally revealed the incredible truth, but many Americans simply would not believe it. After all, Grover Cleveland’s political career was built upon honesty—his most memorable quote was “Tell the truth”—so it was nearly impossible to believe he was involved in such a brazen cover-up. This is the first full account of the disappearance of Grover Cleveland during that summer more than a century ago.
Killing the Poormaster
Killing the Poormaster ›
By Holly Metz
Price 26.95

Published Oct 2012

Reflecting on a sensational murder trial from the late 1930s, this chronicle focuses upon the death of Harry Barck, a poormaster who was granted the authority to decide who would and would not receive public aid in Hoboken, New Jersey. Unemployed mason Joe Scutellaro was said to have stabbed Barck in the heart with a paper spike after the poormaster suggested that Scutellaro’s wife prostitute herself on the streets rather than ask the city for aid. A legal team led by celebrated defender Samuel S. Leibowitz of “Scottsboro Boys” fame swooped into Hoboken from Manhattan to save Scutellaro from the electric chair, arguing that the jobless man’s struggle with the poormaster was a symbol of larger social ills. The book details Leibowitz’s transformation of the Scutellaro trial into an indictment of public relief as a tool for imposing social and political control nationwide. Grappling with issues that are still vital now—massive unemployment, endemic poverty, and the inadequacy of public assistance—this examination lends insight into the current social contract, relaying a gripping narrative that shockingly reads like today’s news.
A Swamp Full of Dollars
A Swamp Full of Dollars ›
By Michael Peel
Price 19.99

Published Jul 2010

A gripping account of how the 50-year life of Nigeria has been shaped by the crude oil that flows from its Niger Delta, this chronicle is peopled with a cast of characters that is stranger than fiction—from the Area Boy gangsters of Lagos and the anti-imperialist militants in their swamp forest hideouts to the oil company executives in their office suites and a corrupt state governor who stashed a million dollars in cash in his west London penthouse. Part travelogue, part straightforward reportage, this cautionary tale for a world that runs on petroleum focuses on the chaos, violence, and politics surrounding oil in Nigeria. Revealing entanglements between Nigerian government officials and the global oil industry, this examination weaves an absorbing, illuminating, and often-surprising story.
Above the Din of War
Above the Din of War ›
By Peter Eichstaedt
Price 26.95

Published Apr 2013

Most books about the war in Afghanistan examine the conflict from the perspective of a foreign correspondent, political analyst, or U.S. soldier, but Above the Din of War focuses on the people of Afghanistan themselves, providing a forum in which the thoughts of everyday people can be considered. Having traveled the country for a year, Peter Eichstaedt draws out Afghans from all walks of life: a former warlord, a Taliban judge, victims of self-immolation, courageous women parliamentarians, would-be suicide bombers, besieged merchants, frightened mullahs, and desperate archaeologists. The book explores a country that both vexes and fascinates the world and relates what its people have to say about living through 30 years of continual unrest, violence, and negative international attention. From his time spent interviewing and living with the people of Afghanistan, Eichstaedt proposes American and NATO exit strategies that could avoid leaving Afghanistan mired in chaos and war. This thought-provoking title from a journalist’s point of view adds a human element to this complex international situation.
Against the Wall
Against the Wall ›
By William Parry
Price 19.95

Published Apr 2011

Featuring the work of acclaimed artists such as Banksy, Ron English, and Blu, as well as Palestinian artists and activists, the photographs in this collection express outrage, compassion, and touching humor while illustrating the lives and livelihoods of the tens of thousands of people affected by Israel's wall. This stunning book of photographs details the graffiti and art that have transformed Israel's Wall of Separation into a canvas of symbolic resistance and solidarity. The compelling images are interspersed with vignettes of the people whose lives are affected by the wall and who suffer due to a lack of work, education, and vital medical care.
Ashamed to Die
Ashamed to Die ›
By Andrew J. Skerritt
Price 24.95

Published Nov 2011

By focusing on a small town in South Carolina, this study of the HIV/AIDS crisis in the South reveals the hard truths of an ongoing and complex issue. Skerritt contends that the United States has failed to adequately address the threat of HIV and AIDS in communities of color and that taboos about love, race, and sexuality—combined with Southern conservatism, white privilege, and black oppression—continue to create an unacceptable death toll. The heartbreak of America’s failure comes alive through case studies of individuals such as Carolyn, a wild child whose rebellion coincided with the advent of AIDS, and Nita, a young woman searching for love and trapped in an abusive relationship. The results are most visible at the town’s segregated burial ground where dozens of young black men and women who have died from AIDS are laid to rest. Not only a call to action and awareness, this is a true story of how persons of faith, enduring love, and limitless forgiveness can inspire others by serving as guides for poor communities facing a public health threat burdened with conflicting moral and social conventions.
Citizen Lane
Citizen Lane ›
By Mark Lane, Foreword by Martin Sheen
Price 26.95

Published Jun 2012

Freedom Rider, friend of Eleanor Roosevelt, Dick Gregory’s vice-presidential running mate, legal defense at Wounded Knee, survivor of the Jonestown Massacre—Mark Lane has been inspiring social consciousness, influencing history makers, and inciting controversy for more than six decades. In Citizen Lane he tells the story of his remarkable life, demonstrating how a single dedicated individual can fight for the underdog, provoke the establishment, and trigger change. From the streets to the courtroom, he has been on the front lines in the events that shaped a generation in opposition to government excesses and war. Icons of the American political and social landscape appear throughout his narrative as Lane's cohorts and companions and as his vicious opponents. Radical leaders embraced him; the FBI and CIA tried to destroy him. No one who dealt with him had a neutral reaction to his forceful, opinionated, larger-than-life persona. Entertaining and enlightening, this autobiography confirms that one person can make a difference and change the lives of millions by holding to his principles regardless of the consequences.
Consuming the Congo
Consuming the Congo ›
By Peter Eichstaedt
Price 24.95

Published Jul 2011

Going behind the headlines and deep into the brutal world of the Congo, this exposé examines why eastern Congo is the most dangerous place on the planet. While the Western world takes for granted its creature comforts such as cell phones or computers, five million Congolese needlessly die in the quest for the valuable minerals that make those technologies work. Much of the war-torn country has largely become lawless, overrun by warlords who exploit and murder the population for their own gain. Delving into the history of the former Belgian colony, this book exposes the horror of day-to-day life in the Congo, largely precipitated by colonial exploitation and internal strife after gaining independence. It offers not only a view into the dire situation but also examines how the Western world, a part of the problem, can become a part of the solution.
Fighting to Serve
Fighting to Serve ›
By Alexander Nicholson
Price 26.95

Published Sep 2012

Revealing the backstage strategies and negotiations that led to the 2010 repeal of the Pentagon’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” (DADT) policy, this history offers a detailed, no-holds-barred account of the controversial policy from an insider’s perspective. In early 2006, the founder of the largest organization for gay and lesbian servicemembers—Servicemembers United—along with fellow former military members who had also been discharged under the DADT policy, toured the United States, speaking about the repeal campaign at American Legion posts, on radio talk shows, and at press conferences across the South and both coasts. Surprised at the mostly positive reception and momentum for the repeal that the tour received, Servicemembers United was suddenly propelled to the forefront of DADT’s repeal fight. From the unique perspective of the only person with a central role on every front in the war against DADT, this examination exposes how various Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) organizations, Congress, and the White House often worked at cross purposes, telling the public they were doing one thing while advocating other strategies behind closed doors.
First Kill Your Family
First Kill Your Family ›
By Peter Eichstaedt
Price 16.95

Published Apr 2013

Told through the voices of those who have suffered, this illuminating exposé examines how a forgotten region of one of Africa’s most promising nations—Uganda, dubbed "the pearl of Africa" by Winston Churchill—has been systematically destroyed by a bloody, senseless, and seemingly endless war that has gone largely unnoticed by the rest of the world. For the past 20 years, the Lord’s Resistance Army has ravaged northern Uganda and has been led by the reclusive Joseph Kony, a former witch doctor and self-professed spirit medium. Through the large-scale abduction and manipulation of children, Kony transformed his army into an efficient killing machine that has murdered nearly 100,000 and displaced two million people. Kony utilized the society's pervasive belief in witchcraft to instill cultlike convictions in his fighters. This insightful analysis delves into the war’s foundations and argues that, much like Rwanda’s genocide, international intervention is needed to stop Uganda’s virulent cycle of violence. This updated paperback edition includes a new afterword by the author that discusses developments since 2008, including failed attempts to capture Joseph Kony and the controversial Kony 2012 video.
Golden
Golden ›
By Jeff Coen, By John Chase
Price 15.99

Published Sep 2012

Revealing previously unreleased information from the Rod Blagojevich investigation, this narrative—written by two Chicago Tribune reporters who spent years sifting through evidence, compiling documents, and conducting more than 100 interviews with those who have known the former governor—is the most complete telling of the Blagojevich story. Beginning on the streets of Chicago and wending its way into the highest reaches of government, the Blagojevich tale brushes up against some of the nation’s most powerful politicians. Detailing the mechanics of the corruption that brought him down and profiling a fascinating and frustrating character who embodies many of the problems found in modern politics, this account dispenses with the sensationalism that surrounded the case to present the facts about one of the nation’s most notorious politicians. Sentenced to 14 years in prison in December 2011, this is the final word on who the governor was, how he was elected, how he got himself into trouble, and how the feds took him down.
Grandma Gatewood's Walk
Grandma Gatewood's Walk ›
By Ben Montgomery
Price 26.95

Published Apr 2014

Emma Gatewood was the first woman to hike the entire Appalachian Trail alone, as well as the first person—man or woman—to walk it twice and three times and she did it all after the age of 65. This is the first and only biography of Grandma Gatewood, as the reporters called her, who became a hiking celebrity in the 1950s and '60s. She appeared on TV with Groucho Marx and Art Linkletter, and on the pages of Sports Illustrated. The public attention she brought to the little-known footpath was unprecedented. Her vocal criticism of the lousy, difficult stretches led to bolstered maintenance, and very likely saved the trail from extinction. Author Ben Montgomery was given unprecedented access to Gatewood's own diaries, trail journals, and correspondence. He also unearthed historic newspaper and magazine articles and interviewed surviving family members and hikers Gatewood met along the trail. The inspiring story of Emma Gatewood illustrates the full power of human spirit and determination.
In the Lion's Den
In the Lion's Den ›
By Andrew Tabler
Price 16.95

Published Sep 2011

A key player in the Middle East and the site of violent protests in 2011, Syria has long been a thorn in Washington's side when it comes to forging peace or rolling back the influence of the Islamic republic of Iran. But only after the events of 9/11 and Damascus's staunch opposition to the war in Iraq did the U.S. government begin an unannounced campaign to pressure President Bashar al-Assad's regime to revamp its regional and domestic policies. The book vividly captures Tabler's behind-the-scenes experiences and provides a firsthand look at 21st-century Syria and Washington's attempts to craft a "New Middle East." Examining the effects of the neoconservatives' strategy and asking what went wrong and how Washington can achieve a new relationship with this pivotal Middle Eastern nation, this investigation provides a rare glimpse into U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East.
Kentucky Clay
Kentucky Clay ›
By Katherine R. Bateman
Price 24.95

Published Nov 2008

Eleven generations of a founding American family are examined in this sweeping history that traces the Clays of Kentucky, a true Southern dynasty. The Clays of Virginia and the Cecils of Maryland were second sons of the English aristocracy who gambled on the New World. Some of the most well-known members of this clan include Henry Clay, who ran for president against James K. Polk; his cousin, Cassius Marcellus Clay, prominent abolitionist and Lincoln’s advisor against slavery; and the matriarch Kizzie Clay, who buried the family silver and escaped by flatboat to avoid marauding Union soldiers. The history of the early colonial period in America—from the time of their arrival in Jamestown, Virginia, in 1613 and St. Mary’s, Maryland, in 1634 through the trek across Virginia to the Appalachian Mountains, their eventual intermarriage in 1800, and their move across the mountains to Kentucky—comes to life through this well-researched family saga that heralds the adventures and accomplishments of the men in the family, as well as reveals the stories and nontraditional roles of the strong, selfish, and headstrong women.
Last Chance for Justice
Last Chance for Justice ›
By T. K. Thorne
Price 26.95

Published Sep 2013

Revealing the story of the reopening of the case of the Birmingham, Alabama, church bombing of 1963, this insider’s account divulges the ins and outs of the investigation led by detective Ben Herren of the Birmingham Police Department and special agent Bill Fleming of the FBI. For more than a year, they analyzed the original FBI files on the bombing and activities of the Ku Klux Klan, then began a search for new evidence. Their first interview—with Klansman Bobby Frank Cherry—broke open the case, but not in the way they expected. Herren and Fleming unearthed lost evidence and convinced long-silent witnesses to tell their stories. With tenacity, humor, dedication, and some luck, the pair encountered the worst and best in human nature on their journey to find justice, and perhaps closure, for the citizens of Birmingham.
Middling Folk
Middling Folk ›
By Linda H. Matthews
Price 24.95

Published Nov 2009

Telling the stories of those who quietly conducted the business and built the livelihoods that made their societies prosper or fail, this account shows how one Scots-Irish American family, the Hammills—millers, wagon makers, and blacksmiths—lived out their lives against the backdrop of the American Revolution, the Civil War, and westward expansion. Spanning three centuries from the shores of Ireland to the Chesapeake Bay Area to the Pacific Northwest, this saga brings to life the early days of the founding of this country through the lens of the middle class. From revolutions, uprisings, and economic booms and busts to owning slaves in the colonial South, these personal encounters through dramatic historical events depict the private dramas—tragic deaths, business successes and failures, love and loss—of the ordinary families who helped shape this country and managed to hold their own through turbulent times.
Murder in Baker Company
Murder in Baker Company ›
By Cilla McCain
Price 24.95

Published Jan 2010

Using court transcripts, personal interviews, and police records to retrace the key events of the case, this journey to uncover the truth about what happened to Richard Davis provides a disturbing, eye-opening look into the problems of today's military. After surviving tours in Bosnia and Iraq, Davis was mercilessly tortured and ultimately murdered before his remains were set on fire in the woods of Georgia. Four members of his own platoon were arrested for the crime. When one was asked why they set Richard on fire, his answer was both cold and revealing: "Because that's the way we got rid of bodies in Iraq." There is no other case on record in which American soldiers have killed one of their own in such a twisted manner. They were home. They were alive. So the only question is, why? This is not only the exploration of the heinous murder of a soldier; it is also a call to action for U.S. citizens to provide support and necessary programs for veteran reentry and reassimilation into U.S. society.
Nine Lives of a Black Panther
Nine Lives of a Black Panther ›
By Wayne Pharr
Price 26.95

Published Jul 2014

In the early morning hours of December 8, 1969, hundreds of SWAT officers engaged in a violent battle with a handful of Los Angeles–based members of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense (BPP). Five hours and 5,000 rounds of ammunition later, three SWAT team members and three Black Panthers lay wounded. For the Panthers and the community that supported them, the shootout symbolized a victory, and a key reason for that victory was the actions of a 19-year-old rank-and-file member of the BPP: Wayne Pharr. Nine Lives of a Black Panther tells Pharr’s riveting story of life in the Los Angeles branch of the BPP and gives a blow-by-blow account of how it prepared for and survived the massive attack. He illuminates the history of one of the most dedicated, dynamic, vilified, and targeted chapters of the BPP, filling in a missing piece of Black Panther history and, in the process, creating an engaging and hard-to-put-down memoir about a time and place that holds tremendous fascination for readers interested in African American militancy.
Occupants
Occupants ›
Photographs by Henry Rollins, By Henry Rollins
Price 35.00

Published Oct 2011

For the past 25 years, Henry Rollins has photographed the most desolate and inhospitable corners of the Earth, and his powerful vision has been harnessed in this photographic essay. Though he is known for the raw power of his expression, Rollins has shown that the greatest statements can be made with the simplest of acts: to bear witness; to be present. This collection is an invitation to do the same. The book pairs Rollins’ visceral photographs—taken in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burma, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Mali, Nepal, North Korea, Northern Ireland, Saudi Arabia, Siberia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam—with writings that provide context and political commentary and thereby magnify the impact of the images. This is a visual testimony of anger, suffering, resilience in the face of tragedy, and the quiet, stronger forces of healing, solidarity, faith, and joy.
Our Way to Fight
Our Way to Fight ›
By Michael Riordon
Price 16.95

Published May 2011

Traveling to thousand-year-old olive groves, besieged villages, refugee camps, checkpoints, and barracks, Michael Riordon talks with people on both sides of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict who fight violence and war through creative resistance. The region remains a symbol of instability fueled by violence and hatred, and this investigation enters into the heart of the dispute and offers a different perspective. The author uncovers the crises that stirred them to act, the risks they face in working for peace, and the small victories that sustain them. These stories of Israelis who refuse to see Palestinians as enemies and Palestinians who practice nonviolent resistance break all stereotypes. In the face of deepening conflict, this portrait of courageous grassroots action provides hope for a livable future and inspiration to peace activists in all nations.
Pedestrianism
Pedestrianism ›
By Matthew Algeo
Price 24.95

Published Apr 2014

Strange as it sounds, during the 1870s and 1880s, America’s most popular spectator sport wasn’t baseball, football, or horseracing—it was competitive walking. Inside sold-out arenas, competitors walked around dirt tracks almost nonstop for six straight days (never on Sunday), risking their health and sanity to see who could walk the farthest—more than 500 miles. These walking matches were as talked about as the weather, the details reported in newspapers and telegraphed to fans from coast to coast. This long-forgotten sport, known as pedestrianism, spawned America’s first celebrity athletes and opened doors for immigrants, African Americans, and women. But along with the excitement came the inevitable scandals, charges of doping and insider gambling, and even a riot in 1879. Pedestrianism chronicles competitive walking’s peculiar appeal and popularity, its rapid demise, and its enduring influence.
Pirate State
Pirate State ›
By Peter Eichstaedt

Published Oct 2010

Providing a timely and never-before-seen perspective on the ever-increasing menace of Somali pirates, this account shows how the cargo ship and oil tanker hijackings and ransoms in the Gulf of Aden and the Indian Ocean have turned one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes into one of the most dangerous. By way of one-on-one interviews with pirates, their associates, their victims, and those who police them, the book reveals piracy’s origins, tactics, and increasing links to terrorists in Somalia, East Africa, and the Middle East, including Yemen, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. These sources point to a scenario in which Somali pirates might not just be out for themselves; they may be a part of a larger, more sinister infrastructure of global financiers and Islamic extremists that—if not dealt with soon—could greatly destabilize the region and perhaps threaten United States national security.
Private
Private ›
By Denver Nicks
Price 24.95

Published Jun 2012

Providing insight into Bradley Manning’s background, this biography paints a nuanced portrait that disputes his depiction in the mainstream media. As the alleged source to WikiLeaks for the biggest breach of military security in American history, Bradley Manning has been inaccurately described as a combative outcast, a bullied and embittered homosexual, and a loser grasping for notoriety; however, this exploration into his past depicts a young man haunted by demons and driven by hope, forced into an ethically fraught situation by a dysfunctional military bureaucracy. The Manning this book uncovers is impulsive and cocky, yet idealistic enough to follow his conscience. In leaking a vast collection of American secrets, he thought he was doing the right thing. His story is one of global significance, and yet he remains an enigma. Now, for the first time, the full truth will be told about a man who, at the age of only 22, changed the world.
Room 1219
Room 1219 ›
By Greg Merritt
Price 29.95

Published Sep 2013

Part biography, part true-crime narrative, this painstakingly researched book chronicles the improbable rise and stunning fall of Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle from his early big screen success to his involvement in actress Virginia Rappe’s death, and the resulting irreparable damage to his career. It describes how during the course of a rowdy party hosted by the comedian in a San Francisco hotel, Rappe became fatally ill, and Arbuckle was subsequently charged with manslaughter. Ultimately acquitted after three trials, neither his career nor his reputation ever recovered from this devastating incident. Relying on a careful examination of documents, the book finally reveals what most likely occurred that Labor Day weekend in 1921 in that fateful hotel room. In addition, it covers the evolution of the film industry—from the first silent experiments to the connection between Arbuckle’s scandal and the implementation of industry-wide censorship that altered the course of Hollywood filmmaking for five decades.
Speaking Out
Speaking Out ›
By Paul Findley, Foreword by Helen Thomas
Price 26.95

Published Jun 2011

In his 22 years as an Illinois congressman and in the years since he left office, Paul Findley has fought to eradicate famine, end wars, and eliminate bigotry in U.S. foreign policy. This sweeping political memoir opens with Findley’s early days in Pittsfield, Illinois—where he was first elected to Congress in 1960—and chronicles his service during six administrations in Washington. His many accomplishments in Congress include authoring the 1973 War Powers Resolution and the Famine Prevention Program, leading agricultural trade missions to the Soviet Union and China, and entering the names and hometowns of all of the soldiers killed in Vietnam into the Congressional Record. This autobiography is also a no-holds-barred critique of Israel’s lobby and its toll on the national interests of the United States. Few politicians are so openly critical of their government, and Findley’s opinions on what he believes to be disastrous foreign policy provide a unique behind-the-scenes perspective on the shaping of these policies in the latter half of the 20th century.
The Almighty Black P Stone Nation
The Almighty Black P Stone Nation ›
By Natalie Y. Moore, By Lance Williams
Price 26.95

Published Jan 2011

This exposé investigates the evolution of the Almighty Black P Stone Nation, a motley group of poverty-stricken teens transformed into a dominant gang accused of terroristic intentions. Interwoven into the narrative is the dynamic influence of leader Jeff Fort, who—despite his flamboyance and high visibility—instilled a rigid structure and discipline that afforded the young men a refuge and a sense of purpose in an often hopeless community. Details of how the Nation procured government funding for gang-related projects during the War on Poverty era and fueled bonuses and job security for law enforcement, and how Fort, in particular, masterminded a deal for $2.5 million to commit acts of terrorism in the United States on behalf of Libya are also revealed. In examining whether the Black P Stone Nation was a group of criminals, brainwashed terrorists, victims of their circumstances, or champions of social change, this social history provides an exploration of how and why gangs flourish and insight into the way in which minority crime is targeted in the community, reported in the media, and prosecuted in the courts.
The Criminal Conversation of Mrs. Norton
The Criminal Conversation of Mrs. Norton ›
By Diane Atkinson
Price 29.95

Published Sep 2013

A forgotten heroine of the women’s rights movement is rescued from obscurity in this biography of Caroline Norton, a respected poet, songwriter, and socialite whose 1836 adultery trial rocked Victorian England. When George Norton accused his wife of having an affair with the British Prime Minister he sparked what was considered “the scandal of the century.” Though she was declared innocent, the humiliated George locked Caroline out of their home, seized her manuscripts, letters, clothes, jewels, and every penny of her earnings, and refused to let her see their three sons. This detailed account of the Norton “criminal conversation” trial sheds vivid light on the desperate position of women in male-dominated Victorian society and chronicles Caroline’s lifelong campaign to establish legal rights for married and divorced women, allowing them to inherit property, take court action on their own behalf, and in effect establishing them for the first time as full-fledged human beings before the law. Figuring into this fascinating story are Norton’s friend and confidante Mary Shelley, longtime admirer Charles Dickens, Lord Byron, Queen Victoria, and other literary and royal heavyweights of the day.
The Dangerous Divide
The Dangerous Divide ›
By Peter Eichstaedt
Price 26.95

Published May 2014

How do we balance border security and America's need for a vital workforce while continuing to provide access to the American dream? Since the attacks of 9/11, the United States has steadily ramped up security along the U.S.-Mexico border, transforming America's legendary Southwest into a frontier of fear. Veteran journalist Peter Eichstaedt roams this fabled region from Tucson, Arizona, to El Paso, Texas, meeting with migrants, border security advocates, and communities ravaged by cross-border crime. Eichstaedt finds that despite tens of thousands of border agents and the expenditure of billions of dollars, an estimated one million Mexicans and Central Americans continue to cross the border each year, filling jobs that have become the underpinnings of the U.S. economy. Rather than building more and better barricades, Eichstaedt argues that the U.S. must reform its immigration and drug laws and acknowledge that costly, counterproductive, and antiquated policies have created deadly circumstances on both sides of the border. Recognizing the truth of America's long and tortured relations with Mexico must be followed by legitimizing the contributions made by migrants to the American way of life.
The Last Warlord
The Last Warlord ›
By Brian Williams
Price 28.95

Published Sep 2013

Chronicling the spectacular rise to power of General Abdul Rashid Dostum, this is an intimate profile of the one of the most powerful warlords to have dominated Afghanistan in the years since the Soviet withdrawal in the late 1980s. His rise from simple peasant villager to warrior against the repressive policies of the Taliban and Al Qaeda is told by one of the few outsiders to be accepted into Dostum’s stronghold in the northern deserts of Afghanistan. Thanks to this unprecedented access, author Brian Glyn Williams was able to conduct lengthy interviews with Dostum and his family, as well as his subcommanders, local chieftains, mullahs, Taliban enemies, prisoners of war, and women’s rights activists. What emerges is an intensely personal account of the Mongol warlord, detailing his childhood, motivations, hopes for his country, and conviction that it is time for a new generation of Western-trained technocrats to shape his country’s destiny. With the drawing down of U.S. troops in 2014 and Dostum poised to reenter the world stage to fight a resurgent Taliban, this timely analysis provides important historical context to the controversy swirling around Afghanistan’s warlord culture and is an essential contribution to the debate on Afghanistan’s future.
The World That Made New Orleans
The World That Made New Orleans ›
By Ned Sublette
Price 16.95

Published Sep 2009

Offering a new perspective on the unique cultural influences of New Orleans, this entertaining history captures the soul of the city and reveals its impact on the rest of the nation. Focused on New Orleans’ first century of existence, a comprehensive, chronological narrative of the political, cultural, and musical development of Louisiana’s early years is presented. This innovative history tracks the important roots of American music back to the swamp town, making clear the effects of centuries-long struggles among France, Spain, and England on the city’s unique culture. The origins of jazz and the city’s eclectic musical influences, including the role of the slave trade, are also revealed. Featuring little-known facts about the cultural development of New Orleans—such as the real significance of gumbo, the origins of the tango, and the first appearance of the words vaudeville and voodoo—this rich historical narrative explains how New Orleans’ colonial influences shape the city still today.
They Dare to Speak Out
They Dare to Speak Out ›
By Paul Findley
Price 18.95

Published May 2003

The first book to speak out against the pervasive influence of the American-Israeli Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) on American politics, policy, and institutions resonates today as never before. With careful documentation and specific case histories, former congressman Paul Findley demonstrates how the Israel lobby helps to shape important aspects of U.S. foreign policy and influences congressional, senatorial, and even presidential elections. Described are the undue influence AIPAC exerts in the Senate and the House and the pressure AIPAC brings to bear on university professors and journalists who seem too sympathetic to Arab and Islamic states and too critical of Israel and its policies. Along with many longtime outspoken critics, new voices speaking out include former President Jimmy Carter, U.S. Representative Cynthia McKinney, Senator Robert Byrd, prominent Arab-American Dr. Ziad Asali, Rabbi Michael Lerner, and journalist Charles Reese. In addition, the lack of open debate among politicians with regard to the U.S. policy in the Middle East is lamented, and AIPAC is blamed in part for this censorship. Connections are drawn between America’s unconditional support of Israel and the raging anti-American passions around the world—and ultimately the tragic events of 9/11. This replaces 1556520735.