Freedom's Journey

Freedom's Journey
Freedom's Journey

Freedom's Journey

African American Voices of the Civil War
Edited by Donald Yacovone, Foreword by Charles Fuller

The Library of Black America series

HISTORY

570 Pages, 6 x 9

Formats: Trade Paper, EPUB, PDF, Mobipocket

MOBIPOCKET, $17.95 (US $17.95) (CA $17.95)

ISBN 9781569769942

Rights: WOR

Chicago Review Press (Feb 2004)
Lawrence Hill Books

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Overview

A stirring collection of African American accounts of the Civil War
The men and women represented in this book had the extraordinary opportunity of witnessing the end of a 200-year struggle for freedom: the Civil War. Gathered here are the stirring testimonies of many African Americans including slaves who endured their last years of servitude before escaping from their masters, soldiers who fought for the freedom of their brethren and for equal rights, and reporters who covered the defeat of their oppressors. These African American voices include the great abolitionist Frederick Douglass on the meaning of the war; Martin R. Delany on his meeting with Lincoln to gain permission to raise an army of African Americans; Susie King Taylor on her life as laundress and nurse to a Union regiment in the deep South; Elizabeth Keckley, Mary Todd Lincoln’s seamstress, on Abraham Lincoln’s journey to Richmond after its fall; Elijah P. Marrs on rising from slave to Union sergeant while fighting for his freedom in Kentucky; and letters from black soldiers to black newspapers. Each testimony is presented unabridged, allowing the full flavor of these voices to be heard, and each is supplemented with introductions and notes that provide rich context.

Author Biography

Donald Yacovone is the senior associate editor at the Massachusetts Historical Society and editor of the Massachusetts Historical Review. His books include a collection of essays on the 54th Massachusetts Regiment and an edition of the Civil War letters of George E. Stephens. He also helped edit the Black Abolitionist Papers. He lives in Medford, Massachusetts.

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